Archive for the ‘advertising strategies’ Category

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The MBA Accelerator

April 15, 2011

The MBA degree has become more and more commonplace, with thousands of students looking forward to graduation in a very short time this spring. Academic institutions concentrate on learning, delivering the academic fundamentals that create a foundation within the workplace.

For one Dallas-based institution, “higher learning” has turned into higher program rankings – and an improved student experience as well.
Professional Development Coaching

The New York Times reports that academic rigor has changed, particularly in the undergraduate environment. The “new rigor” ain’t all that rigorous, as seen here in “The Default Major – Skating through B-School” in the New York Times. Consider this quotation:

    • Business programs also attract more than their share of students who approach college in purely instrumental terms, as a plausible path to a job, not out of curiosity about, say, Ronald Coase’s theory of the firm. “Business education has come to be defined in the minds of students as a place for developing elite social networks and getting access to corporate recruiters,” says Rakesh Khurana, a professor at Harvard Business School who is a prominent critic of the field. It’s an attitude that Dr. Khurana first saw in M.B.A. programs but has migrated, he says, to the undergraduate level.

    One school that seems to “get it”, and understands that the MBA degree is more than just an instrument (or means to an end) is Dallas’ own Southern Methodist University. Founded in 1911, the school celebrates its 100th anniversary this year, as well as a longstanding tradition of academic excellence, particularly in the Edwin L. Cox School of Business. But what’s most impressive is the school’s commitment to expansive teaching, from the Dallas business community. Spearheaded by Dean Al Niemi, the Business Leadership Center is led by Paula Strasser, a twenty-year SMU veteran with close ties to the Dallas marketplace. Paula has assembled a team of 67 experts from the DFW area, to assist in the real-world learning of SMU MBA students.

    While other schools feature impressive boards, and invite CEOs to speak on a regular basis, SMU has taken an approach that adds significantly to the traditional path. While the university attracts nationally-recognized business leaders, local practicioners provide actionable and compelling insights into the day-to-day world of finance, communications, customer innovation, project management and more.

    “The Edwin L. Cox Business Leadership Center (BLC) develops strong leadership skills that are fundamental in the world of business”, according to the BLC brochure. I’m proud to be a part of this organization, and join an elite group of 67 business pro’s who care about SMU, the MBA degree, and the greater Dallas business community. For other schools that aspire to improve their rankings (and the student experience), they must consider the role of the greater business community within the academic environment. What distinguishes the SMU degree is that community connection, and the powerful and tangible networking experience that creates a truly unique learning experience.

    Approximately 92% of Cox graduate students actively participate in the BLC elective programs – meaning, MBA students invest their time with no grade or credit hours as a ‘reward’. The learning and exposure is, in itself, the value equation – and students report that the experience is impactful, and necessary. The students see the value, and make a real investment in their education – an education that is enhanced outside of the classroom. For many students who choose SMU, the BLC is a deciding factor in their choice, since the BLC is unique among graduate business schools and MBA programs.

    Congratulations to Paula Strasser and her team at SMU. And, to Dean Al Niemi, who continues to support this valuable program (now in its 20th year) – I am honored to be a part of this outstanding organization.
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    Chris Westfall is an award-winning instructor at the Business Leadership Center (BLC) at SMU. He regularly speaks on leadership issues in his MBA seminar, “Pick a Team and Win.” He was recently recognized by MBA students with the top teaching award from the Cox School of Business. An alumni of SMU, Chris graduated with a BFA degree from the Meadows School of the Arts. Additionally, he speaks and consults on career management issues, personal branding, management strategies and sales techniques. Other colleges include:

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Got Education?

October 12, 2010

Teams from IdeaWeek descended on multiple locations within the city of Dallas asked people in the street for their best ideas.  What’s on everyone’s mind these days in Dallas? Click play to find out more…

 


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Ideas Wanted: What’s Yours?

October 11, 2010

The average adult has as many as 50,000 thoughts per day – these are unique ideas, that range from “what do I want for dinner?” to “what’s my carbon footprint?”  (FYI: Studies show that your footprint increases, if you eat fried food and cupcakes for dinner).  With 1.3 million people in Dallas, the entire city is generating over 65 Billion thoughts per day, on average.  What if we could harness that cloud of concepts, decisions, and imagination, for business innovation, or social change?

That’s the big idea behind Idea Week, a series of sponsored events leading up to TEDx SMU.  (websites to follow at the end of the post…).  On Monday, October 11, a series of six locations will conduct sessions in “Speed Ideating” – a structured brainstorming, featuring “man-in-the -street” interviews, videos, and more.  (Should that read, “person-in-the-street”? Hopefully you follow my meaning..)

 

SMU logo

TEDx Happens Here

 

Speed Ideating is a method for generating new ideas on a product, issue or situation.  Think of it as structured brainstorming, with each idea building on the last.  It’s all guided by a moderator, whose job is to get you thinking, talking, and ideating.  The five topics to be addressed on Monday are:

1. Mainstreaming eco-transportation

2. Improving public education in North Texas

3. Changing the automobile

4. Preventing bullying in schools

5. Reducing waste

Do you have a few ideas?  Come on out and share your thoughts, with the team at Idea Week.  Can’t make it out? Send your thoughts to ideaweek@gmail.com.  If you can, come out and meet some of the local business celebrities onsite, at the various sites.  Here are the locations for the sessions, starting at noon today:

 

Jeremy Gregg

 

1.  Meet Jeremy Gregg – Executive Director of Executives in Action

  • Preston Center – NW Hwy and Preston Road, near Sprinkles and Taco Diner

2.  Fair Park DART Station, Perry and Exposition (Entrance to Texas State Fair)

3. Meet Gabriella Draney, Founder of Tech Wildcatters, in Deep Ellum (2615 Commerce Street)

4.  Downtown Dallas, corner of Ross and St. Paul

5.  Thanksgiving Square – Back Beat Cafe, 300 N. Akard

 

Lori Darley

 

6.  Meet Lori Darley, top executive coach

Bishop Arts – in front of Hattie’s, in the Bishop Arts center in Oak Cliff

Why not come on out, and share some thoughts – or, send an email to the address below with your ideas.  It only takes a moment to offer something that could make a difference.  And, look at it this way: even if you share 3 new ideas, you still have 49,997 left for the rest of the day.

One person – one idea- can make a difference.  What’s yours?

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Resources:

  • Twitter: @IdeaWeek
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Thoughts on Prospecting

May 15, 2010

The most effective prospecting strategies are the ones that focus on creating a dialogue with the customer; that’s why Web 2.0 is so powerful. For me, the mark of powerful prospecting is when the customer says “Tell me more” – that’s the “opt-in” that you want. Clever prospecting takes the form of an invitation – where you are asked to join or participate with like-minded customers. You can imagine this concept with the old Amex slogan, “Membership has its privileges”…or just look at any social media site…for ideas. Doesn’t matter if you have a product or service; invite your customers – don’t “sell them”. Show how your service has solved problems for other like-minded individuals, demonstrate your value, and create the dialogue you want.

BTW: Who likes “being sold”? But we all want to go where the action is – where the deals are – where the products are useful and practical, etc.

The most effective prospecting strategies start with a story that is specific enough to be engaging, but broad enough that a contact replies (tweet, email. sign-up, or otherwise) with interest. Three magic words to look for:  “Tell me more…”.  That response let’s you know that the dialogue has begun, and Web 2.0 is all about the dialogue.  Where does yours begin?

A great way to engage is using referrals or recommendations, from similar customers, to attract a response. How have others benefited from your offer, and why do you think you could produce similar results, right now, for your next customer? Make your message specific and targeted, based on your current client engagements, and you will create the kind of interest (and prospecting) that leads to a sale.

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The Best Advertising

April 8, 2010

For companies and individuals, advertising for 2010 can be summarized in one word: referrals. The wave of social media and instant connectivity means that customers are talking first, last and center to prospects, and vice versa. A client recently asked if his advertising budget looked “about right”. It did; but I added: what you spend on talking about yourself is not nearly as important as what others are saying about you.Seems like today’s advertising isn’t about informing and driving sales, as much as it’s about trying to create a ‘hook” within the constant barrage of promises and promotion. There’s a lot of information out there, and all of us are interested in clarity. Will the product (or service) deliver as promised? The best way to know is through what others are saying – not what the advertiser says.

The call to action today is: Please go online and find out what others say about our stuff. Ads still create interest but the best advertisement for my money: Solid referrals.