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The Interview Question

November 16, 2010

What’s the one question that most job seekers forget to ask, in the interview? Professional development coach Chris Westfall provides insight that can help you to know exactly how you compare to your competition, and what you need to discuss in the interview to move your career forward.

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Got Education?

October 12, 2010

Teams from IdeaWeek descended on multiple locations within the city of Dallas asked people in the street for their best ideas.  What’s on everyone’s mind these days in Dallas? Click play to find out more…

 


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Ideas Wanted: What’s Yours?

October 11, 2010

The average adult has as many as 50,000 thoughts per day – these are unique ideas, that range from “what do I want for dinner?” to “what’s my carbon footprint?”  (FYI: Studies show that your footprint increases, if you eat fried food and cupcakes for dinner).  With 1.3 million people in Dallas, the entire city is generating over 65 Billion thoughts per day, on average.  What if we could harness that cloud of concepts, decisions, and imagination, for business innovation, or social change?

That’s the big idea behind Idea Week, a series of sponsored events leading up to TEDx SMU.  (websites to follow at the end of the post…).  On Monday, October 11, a series of six locations will conduct sessions in “Speed Ideating” – a structured brainstorming, featuring “man-in-the -street” interviews, videos, and more.  (Should that read, “person-in-the-street”? Hopefully you follow my meaning..)

 

SMU logo

TEDx Happens Here

 

Speed Ideating is a method for generating new ideas on a product, issue or situation.  Think of it as structured brainstorming, with each idea building on the last.  It’s all guided by a moderator, whose job is to get you thinking, talking, and ideating.  The five topics to be addressed on Monday are:

1. Mainstreaming eco-transportation

2. Improving public education in North Texas

3. Changing the automobile

4. Preventing bullying in schools

5. Reducing waste

Do you have a few ideas?  Come on out and share your thoughts, with the team at Idea Week.  Can’t make it out? Send your thoughts to ideaweek@gmail.com.  If you can, come out and meet some of the local business celebrities onsite, at the various sites.  Here are the locations for the sessions, starting at noon today:

 

Jeremy Gregg

 

1.  Meet Jeremy Gregg – Executive Director of Executives in Action

  • Preston Center – NW Hwy and Preston Road, near Sprinkles and Taco Diner

2.  Fair Park DART Station, Perry and Exposition (Entrance to Texas State Fair)

3. Meet Gabriella Draney, Founder of Tech Wildcatters, in Deep Ellum (2615 Commerce Street)

4.  Downtown Dallas, corner of Ross and St. Paul

5.  Thanksgiving Square – Back Beat Cafe, 300 N. Akard

 

Lori Darley

 

6.  Meet Lori Darley, top executive coach

Bishop Arts – in front of Hattie’s, in the Bishop Arts center in Oak Cliff

Why not come on out, and share some thoughts – or, send an email to the address below with your ideas.  It only takes a moment to offer something that could make a difference.  And, look at it this way: even if you share 3 new ideas, you still have 49,997 left for the rest of the day.

One person – one idea- can make a difference.  What’s yours?

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Resources:

  • Twitter: @IdeaWeek
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Professional Development Coaching

October 4, 2010

Chris Westfall talks about “what they don’t teach you in business school” (video)

Are you looking for ways to capitalize on the value of your educational experience?

Produced by Your Online Video, Inc. Dallas, TX  http://youronlinevideo.net

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What’s the Value of an MBA?

September 29, 2010

There are some things they don’t teach you in business school…

What’s the value of the MBA degree? Every program has a cost, whether you pay through student loans or scholarships.  And, there’s also an investment – whether you go to school part-time, full-time or on the weekends.  So, there’s an investment of time.  Of course, there is the quality of the teaching in the classroom that has to be considered.  But what is the value of the MBA?

We all know that thousands of students graduate from MBA programs each year.  But the value of the degree is more than the cost, more than the quality of the teaching, more than the investment.  The value of the MBA can only be found in action.

The real value of the MBA is based on what the students make of it.  Top MBA programs realize that they have to give students real-world insights that can help them to apply their knowledge in a new economy.  Studying the work of Deming, Porter or Bennis is crucial to establishing a knowledge-base.  But, it’s what you do with that knowledge that establishes the value of the degree.

In my coaching sessions with professionals and MBA students, I focus on what they don’t teach you in business school.  Topics include:

  • Personal branding: Going beyond “sensible shoes, matching belt” to create executive-level interaction
  • Business Development Strategies:  Emails that Get Results, How to Bridge the Gap between Gen-Y and the Hiring Manager, Web 2.0 & Search Tools
  • Leadership:  Communicating at the executive level, and establishing yourself as a leader (no matter where you are in your career path)
  • Promotions, Raises, and Responsibility: How to Negotiate like a Pro, and Know When It’s Time to Move Up (or, Move Out)

Going Beyond the Classroom

The economy has changed, and MBA programs need to adapt.  More than the employment picture, MBA programs must consider the value of their brand – the application of the knowledge they provide.  By providing students with insight that they can’t find elsewhere, schools create competitive advantage, and enhance the value and prestige of their institution.

In my career, I have answered phones, done data entry work, and even delivered food.  I’ve also run a global sales force, with responsibility for 1200 systems integrators and distribution in 68 foreign countries.  In order to move from “smiling, filing and dialing” to the corner office, I had to become a student of success – observing and noting what skills and techniques were rewarded in the workplace.  For top-quality graduate programs in the new economy, the prestige of the degree (or the institution) isn’t enough.  Professionals have to understand how to apply their new-found knowledge, if they want to maximize the value of their degree.

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Fixing Alec Baldwin

September 17, 2010

While “Always be closing” makes for some interesting drama, it’s a recipe for disaster in this economy. Real sales strategies don’t come from Hollywood –  so, how about a plan that you can actually use?

Every sales person, every Alec Baldwin fan, maybe everybody who can read and write, knows the slogan, “Always be closing”. That was the message from his character, Blake, in the classic movie, “Glengarry Glen Ross”.  As much as I enjoy Alec Baldwin as a performer, “Always be Closing” is a recipe for disaster in the current economy. I’m seeing a lot of individuals “go for the close” (and fail) when what they really need to know is: how to go for the sale.  While Web 2.0 tools have opened up new ways of communicating and marketing to customers, there’s still a need to get face to face to close a deal.    If that scenario is something you deal with on a daily basis, then read on, MacDuff.

Here’s a little secret that is the one common characteristic of every successful sales engagement, and every successful sales person. The one most important characteristic of sales success isn’t the killer close, or mental toughness, or a strong forceful personality, or…or whatever.

The best salesperson is ALWAYS the one who is in front of a customer who wants to buy what they are selling. Think about it. Finding a customer that’s buying is the secret ingredient. It’s not some slick closing strategy or verbal kung-fu that forces a sale. If you have the talents of a monkey, and a customer that wants to buy what you’ve got, you are going to close a deal… and be able to pick up objects with your feet. Impressive! Qualifying an opportunity has never been more important. And, opportunities are scarce! So, how do you do when it comes to qualifying opportunities?

Based on my experience, the number one thing you can do to help grow your business -especially if your business is the “business of YOU”: learn how to “always be QUALIFYING”, and the transaction will take care of itself.

Are You Qualified to Drink This?
Questions are a great way to approach an opportunity, because of what is implied behind the curiosity. (And I’m not talking about questions like, “If I can drop the price by 2%, will you buy TODAY?!?”) The questions I’m talking about are the kinds that yield results – a series of “yes” answers that helps you to clearly define the customers needs. Your concern, your caring, your experience, your product knowledge all are conveyed …indirectly. It’s a style shift, and it can be subtle, but the results are huge. The message behind the message is that you are genuinely concerned about the customer’s concerns – and, quite frankly, the mutual fit for your agendas. You go from “telling and selling” to helping your customer to solve a problem. As you help to identify their needs, you tailor your services and solutions for what they want, not just what you can do. The best person to articulate customer needs is always the customer. If there’s no need, there’s no sale.

Of course, there are many more aspects of qualification. What’s the budget? How did you hear about me/my company/my gorilla-like reflexes, etc.? Have you ever seen/used/owned equipment like this before? What is the salary for this position? Etc. etc. All important questions, and all must be asked as part of the needs identification and implementation phase.

You still have to ask for the business. But closing is just the final step in the qualifying process. First, make sure that you’ve got a qualified customer that’s come forward with some real clear needs, and you are almost home. With all due respect to Alec Baldwin, remember to “always be qualifying”… unless, of course, all you want to end up with is a set of steak knives.

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What CEOs Really Want

September 14, 2010

Click the image to see more on this report

Recently, IBM surveyed over 1500 CEOs, to find out their most pressing challenges.  The complexity of the worldwide markets, combined with an increased rate of change, were the top remarks.  In attempting to deal with the challenges of the current economy, business leaders cited one quality above all others that can help employees to make a difference.

Surprisingly, the most-desired quality or characteristic was not technical competence.  It wasn’t loyalty, or communication skills, or financial acumen.  The number-one most important characteristic for business leaders?  Creativity.

Surprising, when you consider the traditional definitions of creativity.  For “creatives”, that word is used as both a description, and an excuse (Ever heard this one? “We can’t/won’t/don’t do that, we’re ‘creative'”).  Under careful consideration, “being creative” is not always a positive and encouraging description.  Where do you find “creative” accountants, for example?  Answer: Jail.

For financial professionals, project managers, executives and other task- or numbers-oriented individuals, the call for creativity seems quite contrary to the training and experiences that form the very foundation of the business world.  “Creative” is a department, or a compartment, reserved for individuals with unique talents that are not particularly commonplace in shipping, accounts payable, or operations.  So, “creativity” is rare, shapeless, often negative, potentially dangerous and certainly counter-intuitive.  Has IBM generated a survey that appeals for an artsy-craftsy approach to business?  Or is there a deeper meaning that this author has carefully chosen to ignore, in an attempt to roll out a few one-liners? (Ah, you caught me….)  This survey actually says that it is time for creativity to turn this economy around.

Creativity, in the context of business, means the power of creation.  Creativity is the way that we harness our imagination to disrupt the status quo, and find new solutions to the same old problems. The global leaders in the IBM survey seek creative solutions to experiment and innovate.  The leaders in the survey identify creativity as the antidote for the status quo, and central to the necessary disruption that is required for our collective marketplace to get unstuck.

CEOs are looking for ways to shake up their portfolios, their business models, and their old ways of addressing challenges in the marketplace.

Business leaders expect complexity to increase, and the need for disruption to follow (perhaps even lead) the advancement.  Creativity is needed, above all else, in order to innovate and lead through this current financial climate.  Why?  Because business must create a new future.  That future must build on the present, but in new and meaningful ways – ways that can only be described as “creative”, because they haven’t been created yet!

Creativity means many things, but at its core, the process of creation begins with an idea.  Based on current information, “what if?” opens the door to imagination – and new solutions can only come from within the realm of new ideas.  As the economy continues to churn and struggle, the leaders of tomorrow are the ones who are open to new concepts, new perspectives and new solutions.  Seeing things as they are is an important skill (awareness), but seeing things as they could be – and then making them that way – well, that takes some creativity.  Don’t you agree?