Posts Tagged ‘MBA programs’

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The MBA Accelerator

April 15, 2011

The MBA degree has become more and more commonplace, with thousands of students looking forward to graduation in a very short time this spring. Academic institutions concentrate on learning, delivering the academic fundamentals that create a foundation within the workplace.

For one Dallas-based institution, “higher learning” has turned into higher program rankings – and an improved student experience as well.
Professional Development Coaching

The New York Times reports that academic rigor has changed, particularly in the undergraduate environment. The “new rigor” ain’t all that rigorous, as seen here in “The Default Major – Skating through B-School” in the New York Times. Consider this quotation:

    • Business programs also attract more than their share of students who approach college in purely instrumental terms, as a plausible path to a job, not out of curiosity about, say, Ronald Coase’s theory of the firm. “Business education has come to be defined in the minds of students as a place for developing elite social networks and getting access to corporate recruiters,” says Rakesh Khurana, a professor at Harvard Business School who is a prominent critic of the field. It’s an attitude that Dr. Khurana first saw in M.B.A. programs but has migrated, he says, to the undergraduate level.

    One school that seems to “get it”, and understands that the MBA degree is more than just an instrument (or means to an end) is Dallas’ own Southern Methodist University. Founded in 1911, the school celebrates its 100th anniversary this year, as well as a longstanding tradition of academic excellence, particularly in the Edwin L. Cox School of Business. But what’s most impressive is the school’s commitment to expansive teaching, from the Dallas business community. Spearheaded by Dean Al Niemi, the Business Leadership Center is led by Paula Strasser, a twenty-year SMU veteran with close ties to the Dallas marketplace. Paula has assembled a team of 67 experts from the DFW area, to assist in the real-world learning of SMU MBA students.

    While other schools feature impressive boards, and invite CEOs to speak on a regular basis, SMU has taken an approach that adds significantly to the traditional path. While the university attracts nationally-recognized business leaders, local practicioners provide actionable and compelling insights into the day-to-day world of finance, communications, customer innovation, project management and more.

    “The Edwin L. Cox Business Leadership Center (BLC) develops strong leadership skills that are fundamental in the world of business”, according to the BLC brochure. I’m proud to be a part of this organization, and join an elite group of 67 business pro’s who care about SMU, the MBA degree, and the greater Dallas business community. For other schools that aspire to improve their rankings (and the student experience), they must consider the role of the greater business community within the academic environment. What distinguishes the SMU degree is that community connection, and the powerful and tangible networking experience that creates a truly unique learning experience.

    Approximately 92% of Cox graduate students actively participate in the BLC elective programs – meaning, MBA students invest their time with no grade or credit hours as a ‘reward’. The learning and exposure is, in itself, the value equation – and students report that the experience is impactful, and necessary. The students see the value, and make a real investment in their education – an education that is enhanced outside of the classroom. For many students who choose SMU, the BLC is a deciding factor in their choice, since the BLC is unique among graduate business schools and MBA programs.

    Congratulations to Paula Strasser and her team at SMU. And, to Dean Al Niemi, who continues to support this valuable program (now in its 20th year) – I am honored to be a part of this outstanding organization.
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    Chris Westfall is an award-winning instructor at the Business Leadership Center (BLC) at SMU. He regularly speaks on leadership issues in his MBA seminar, “Pick a Team and Win.” He was recently recognized by MBA students with the top teaching award from the Cox School of Business. An alumni of SMU, Chris graduated with a BFA degree from the Meadows School of the Arts. Additionally, he speaks and consults on career management issues, personal branding, management strategies and sales techniques. Other colleges include:

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Professional Development Coaching

October 4, 2010

Chris Westfall talks about “what they don’t teach you in business school” (video)

Are you looking for ways to capitalize on the value of your educational experience?

Produced by Your Online Video, Inc. Dallas, TX  http://youronlinevideo.net

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What’s the Value of an MBA?

September 29, 2010

There are some things they don’t teach you in business school…

What’s the value of the MBA degree? Every program has a cost, whether you pay through student loans or scholarships.  And, there’s also an investment – whether you go to school part-time, full-time or on the weekends.  So, there’s an investment of time.  Of course, there is the quality of the teaching in the classroom that has to be considered.  But what is the value of the MBA?

We all know that thousands of students graduate from MBA programs each year.  But the value of the degree is more than the cost, more than the quality of the teaching, more than the investment.  The value of the MBA can only be found in action.

The real value of the MBA is based on what the students make of it.  Top MBA programs realize that they have to give students real-world insights that can help them to apply their knowledge in a new economy.  Studying the work of Deming, Porter or Bennis is crucial to establishing a knowledge-base.  But, it’s what you do with that knowledge that establishes the value of the degree.

In my coaching sessions with professionals and MBA students, I focus on what they don’t teach you in business school.  Topics include:

  • Personal branding: Going beyond “sensible shoes, matching belt” to create executive-level interaction
  • Business Development Strategies:  Emails that Get Results, How to Bridge the Gap between Gen-Y and the Hiring Manager, Web 2.0 & Search Tools
  • Leadership:  Communicating at the executive level, and establishing yourself as a leader (no matter where you are in your career path)
  • Promotions, Raises, and Responsibility: How to Negotiate like a Pro, and Know When It’s Time to Move Up (or, Move Out)

Going Beyond the Classroom

The economy has changed, and MBA programs need to adapt.  More than the employment picture, MBA programs must consider the value of their brand – the application of the knowledge they provide.  By providing students with insight that they can’t find elsewhere, schools create competitive advantage, and enhance the value and prestige of their institution.

In my career, I have answered phones, done data entry work, and even delivered food.  I’ve also run a global sales force, with responsibility for 1200 systems integrators and distribution in 68 foreign countries.  In order to move from “smiling, filing and dialing” to the corner office, I had to become a student of success – observing and noting what skills and techniques were rewarded in the workplace.  For top-quality graduate programs in the new economy, the prestige of the degree (or the institution) isn’t enough.  Professionals have to understand how to apply their new-found knowledge, if they want to maximize the value of their degree.